10 Facts About Dodo Bird You Need to Know About


prehistoric birds

Dodo birds were once one of the most common creatures on earth. They were so populous that they were considered a pest by many. But with the arrival of humans on the scene, dodo birds soon found themselves hunted to extinction. Here are 10 interesting facts about these fascinating creatures.

1. The dodo bird is a member of the pigeon family.

Dodo Bird

The dodo bird is a member of the pigeon family. It belongs to the Columbidae group, which includes about 300 different species of pigeons and doves. The dodo bird was originally found on Mauritius Island in the Indian Ocean, but because they were so easy to catch and eat, they went extinct soon after human settlers arrived there in the 1500s.

2. The name “dodo” comes from the Portuguese word for stupid, dods.

Dodo Bird

The dodo bird is a species of extinct flightless bird from Mauritius. It has been extinct since the mid-to-late 17th century. The name “dodo” comes from the Portuguese word for stupid, dods. Despite its recent extinction, it was once common on Mauritius and nearby islands but had no natural predators.

3. The dodo bird was endemic to the island of Mauritius.

The dodo bird was endemic to the island of Mauritius. This means that it was found nowhere else in the world and that it was unique to that one place. The dodo became extinct on the island in the 17th century, likely due to human hunting and habitat destruction.

4. The last known sighting of a dodo bird was in 1681.

The last known sighting of a dodo bird was in 1681. It is unknown what happened to the species, but it’s speculated that they were hunted by humans and their habitat was lost due to human activity.

Dodo birds were flightless, fat, and clumsy-looking creatures with a head as large as its body. They had no natural predators and were unable to defend themselves against humans. The dodo bird was a symbol of human stupidity and greed.

5. The dodo bird is thought to have weighed between 20 and 30 pounds.

The dodo bird is thought to have weighed between 20 and 30 pounds.  The weight of the dodo bird has been a long-debated topic, with estimates ranging from 5 kilograms (11 lb) to 100 kilograms (220 lb).

6. The dodo bird was approximately three feet tall.

The dodo bird was a flightless bird that became extinct in the 17th century. It was approximately three feet tall and had a large, round body. The dodo bird is most well-known for its lack of fear towards humans, which led to its eventual extinction.

7. The dodo bird had a beak that was well-suited for cracking open nuts.

The dodo bird had a beak that was well-suited for cracking open nuts. This helped the dodo bird to survive on the islands of Mauritius and Comoros, where it lived before being hunted to extinction by humans.

8. The dodo bird was flightless.

The dodo bird was flightless.   The dodo bird is notorious for being a dumb, fat, and lazy creature. Nevertheless, it had the special attributes that made it an important part of the ecosystem on Mauritius where populations were first introduced by Dutch sailors in 1598. They would eat fruit and seeds but also destroy crops with their big feet.

9. The dodo bird was an omnivore.

The dodo bird was an omnivore. The diet of the Dodo consisted mainly of fruits, vegetables, and small animals such as crabs and shellfish. It is said that they would also partake in raiding farmers’ crops on occasion.

When it came to hunting larger prey like young deer or pigs, the Dodo could not take them on alone and so would enlist the help of their close relatives, the solitaires.

10. The dodo bird was hunted to extinction by humans.

The dodo bird was hunted to extinction by humans. The dodo bird, a flightless bird native to the island of Mauritius and nearby islands in the Indian Ocean, has been extinct since around 1681. Though it is possible that some live on as hybrids with other species such as pigeons and may exist undetected today, no one has seen a purebred dodo bird since the last one died in captivity in the early 18th century.

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