Top 7 Biggest Birds In the World You Must Know About


biggest birds

You don’t have to be a bird-watcher to know that birds come in all shapes, sizes, and species. Discover the world’s 7 biggest birds with this list of the most massive avian creatures on Earth. From turkey vultures (which can reach up to 30 inches long) to ostriches (who weigh as much as 345 pounds), these are the biggest birds in the world.

1. Ostrich:

biggest birds

The ostrich is not only the biggest bird on this list, but it’s also the largest living bird in the world. Males can weigh up to 345 pounds and stand more than 9 feet tall, making them about twice the size of an average human. Females are smaller, but they’re still pretty impressive, weighing up to 275 pounds and standing more than 7 feet tall.

2. Andean Condor:

biggest birds

The second-largest bird in the world is the Andean condor, which has a wingspan of up to 10.5 feet. These massive birds are native to the mountains of South America and can weigh up to 27 pounds.

3. Dalmatian Pelican:

The Dalmatian Pelican is the largest member of the pelican family. It grows up to 1.8 m (5.9 ft) long, 3 m (9.8 ft) wide across the wings, and can weigh up to 15 kg (33 lb). The average weight however is only 10 kg (22 lb). These birds are identical in appearance to the White Pelican except for size. Their plumage is white with black wings and a small amount of grey on the neck. The large bill is orange with a hook at the end. The legs and feet are also orange. Their breeding habitat is marshes with some trees or bushes in Europe, southern Asia, and Africa. They build a large nest platform of sticks on a tree, bush, or reed bed. They lay 2-4 eggs.

4. Great White Pelican:

The Great White Pelican is very large, with a length of 1.8–3 m (5.9–9.8 ft) and a wingspan of 3–3.6 m (9.8–11.8 ft). The second-largest member of the pelican family, this massive bird weighs in at 15–30 kg (33–66 lb). Great White Pelicans are almost entirely white, with black flight feathers at the edge of the wings. The bill is yellow and very large, as is the pouch below it. These birds have webbed feet and legs that are pink or orange in color. They breed around large lakes in Africa, southern Asia, and southern Europe. 5–8 white eggs are laid in a nest made from twigs, reeds, and straw, which is built on the ground or in a tree.

5. Greater Rhea:

The Greater Rhea is a large bird that is native to South America. It grows to 1.5 m (4.9 ft) tall and 3 m (9.8 ft) long, and it can weigh up to 35 kg (77 lb). The Greater Rhea is mostly grey or brown, with a white belly. It has a long neck and legs, and its wings are reduced to short stubs. These birds are flightless, but they can run up to 40 km/h (25 mph). They live in groups of up to 100 individuals, and they defend their territory with vigorous displays and fighting. The Greater Rhea is an omnivorous bird, and it will eat just about anything, from plants to small animals.

6. Australian Pelican:

The Australian Pelican is a very large bird that grows 1.8 m (5.9 ft) long and 3.6 m (11.8 ft) wide. It can weigh up to 15 kg (33 lb), making it the third-largest member of the pelican family. The Australian Pelican is mostly white, with black flight feathers and a yellow bill. It has webbed feet and legs that are pink or orange in color. These birds breed around large lakes in Australia and New Guinea. They build a large nest platform of sticks, reeds, and straw, which is built on the ground or in a tree. They lay 2-5 eggs.

7. Oriental Darter:

The Oriental Darter is a large bird that grows to 1.5 m (4.9 ft) long and 3 m (9.8 ft) wide. It can weigh up to 10 kg (22 lb), making it the fourth-largest member of the pelican family. The Oriental Darter is mostly black, with a white belly and a yellow bill. It has webbed feet and legs that are pink or orange in color. These birds breed around large lakes in southern Asia. They build a large nest platform of sticks, reeds, and straw, which is built on the ground or in a tree. They lay 2-5 eggs.

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